Category Robotics Classification

Page 1 of 239
1 2 3 239

#ICRA2022 networking events

Photo credits: Wise Old Multimedia

IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA) has given many opportunities over the years for researchers, industries, students and the enthusiasts to network and collaborate. In a similar fashion, this year in 2022, there were great number of opportunities to involve and engage as well including networking events.

A week before the conference, IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, Women in Engineering (RAS WiE) organized a free virtual event for the enthusiasts from the robotics research field to learn and discuss the aspects of Becoming a Plenary/Keynote Speaker in an International Robotics Conference. Three extraordinary robotics researchers, Dr. Vandi Verma, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, USA, Dr. Katherine Kuchenbecker, Director, Haptic Intelligence Department, Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Germany and Prof. Lydia Kavraki, Greek-American computer scientist, the Noah Harding Professor of Computer Science, a professor of bioengineering, electrical and computer engineering, and mechanical engineering, Rice University discussed their career paths, opportunities and difficulties they’ve faced along their journey as a woman in engineering, mentoring, STEM promotion and work-life balance. The panelists also shared their invaluable personal experience and discussed the importance of learning together. The event was remarkable.

There were a lot of in-depth discussions duing the workshop. We discussed the importance of practicing a talk as a way of respecting the audience during conferences, advocating for others as we never know who out there is reflecting themselves on us and that how if we have no paper rejected, we are probably playing it too safe. Further, we also discussed about finding one’s niche and being the best at it. The idea of an aliveness detector was extra-ordinary. The concept behind the aliveness detector is that it is described as the key to understand why you like what you like, or what makes you feel alive, and having the curiosity to explore and connect your questions to the known knowledge. The workshop ended with other researchers and participants introducing themselves to the audience and thereby getting both exposure and growing network.

While I couldn’t make it to in-person networking events, the following networking events were hosted and turned out to be a tremondous success indeed.

  • Social Hour Hosted by the RAS Student Activities Committee
  • US Black in Robotics (BiR)
  • RAS Women In Engineering (WIE) Networking Apéro Event on The Benefits of Diversity in Research Teams
  • ICRA Welcome Reception
  • ICRA 2022 Dinner Reception
  • RAS Booth at ICRA

ROS Awards 2022 results

The ROS Awards are the Oscars of the ROS world! The intention of these awards is to express recognition for contributions to the ROS community and the development of the ROS-based robot industry, and to help those contributions gain awareness.

Conditions

  • Selection of the winners is made by anonymous online voting over a period of 2 weeks
  • Anybody in the ROS community can vote through the voting enabled website
  • Organizers of the awards provide an initial list of 10 possible projects for each category but the list can be increased at any time by anybody during the voting period
  • Since the Awards are organized by The Construct none of its products or developers can be voted
  • Winners are announced at the ROS Developers Day yearly conference
  • New on 2022 edition: Winners of previous editions cannot win again, in order to not concentrate the focus on the same projects all the time. Remember, with these awards, we want to help spread all ROS projects!

Voting

  1. Every person can only vote once in each category
  2. You cannot change your answers once you have submitted your vote
  3. Voting is closed 3 days before the conference, and a list of the finalists per each category is announced in the same week
  4. Voters cannot use flaws in the system to influence voting. Any detection of trying to trick the system will disqualify the votes. You can, though, promote your favorite among your networks so others vote for it.

Measures have been taken to prevent as much as possible batch voting from a single person.

Categories

Best ROS Software

The Best ROS Software category comprises any software that runs with ROS. It can be a package published on the ROS.org repo of just a software that uses ROS libraries to produce an input. Open Source and closed source are both valid.

Finalists

  1. Ignition Gazebo, by Open Robotics
  2. Groot Behavior Tree, by Davide Faconti
  3. Webots, by Cyberbotics
  4. SMACC2, by Brett Aldrich
  5. ros2_control, by several ROS developers
  6. PlotJuggler, by Davide Faconti

Winner: Webots, by Cyberbotics

Learn more about the winner in this video:

Best ROS-Based Robot

The Best ROS-Based Robot category includes any robot that runs ROS inside it. They can be robotics products, robots for research, or robots for education. In all cases, they must be running ROS inside.

Finalists

  1. Panda robot arm, by Franka Emika
  2. TIAGo, by Pal Robotics
  3. UR robot arm, by Universal Robots
  4. Turtlebot 4, by Clearpath
  5. Nanosaur, by Raffaello Bonghi
  6. Leo Rover, by Leo Rover

Winner: Nanosaur, by Raffaello Bonghi

Learn more about the winner in this video:

Best ROS Developer

Developers are the ones that create all the ROS software that we love. The Best ROS Developer category allows you to vote for any developer who has contributed to ROS development in one sense or another.

Finalists

  1. Francisco Martín
  2. Davide Faconti
  3. Raffaello Bonghi
  4. Brett Aldrich
  5. Victor Mayoral Vilches
  6. Pradheep Krishna

Winner: Francisco Martín

Learn more about the winner in this video:

Insights from the 2022 Edition

  1. This year, the third time we organise the awards, we have increased the total number of votes by 500% So we can say that the winners are a good representation of the feelings of the community.
  2. Still this year, the winners of previous editions received many votes. Fortunately, we applied the new rule of not allowing to win previous winners, to provide space for other ROS projects have the focus on the community, and hence help to create a rich ROS ecosystem.

Conclusions

The ROS Awards started in 2020 with a first edition where the winners were some of the best and well-known projects in the ROS world. In this third edition, we have massively increased the number of votes from the previous edition. We expect this award will continue to contribute to the spreading of good ROS projects.

See you again at ROS Awards 2023!

ep.357: Origin Story of the OAK-D, with Brandon Gilles

Brandon Gilles, Founder and CEO of Luxonis, tells us his story about how Luxonis designed one of the most versatile perception platforms on the market.

Brandon took the lessons learned from his time at Ubiquiti, which transformed networking with network-on-a-chip architectures, and applied the mastery of embedded hardware and software to the OAK-D camera and the broader OAK line of products.

To refer to the OAK-D as a stereovision camera tells only part of the story. Aside from depth sensing, the OAK-D leverages the Intel Myriad X to perform perception computations directly on the camera in a highly power-efficient architecture.

Customers can also instantly leverage a wide array of open-source computer vision and AI packages that are pre-calibrated to the optics system.

Additionally, by leveraging a system-on-a-module design, the Luxonis team easily churns out a multitude of variations of the hardware platform to fit the wide variety of customer use cases. Tune in for more.

Brandon Gilles

Brandon Gilles is the Founder and CEO of Luxonis, maker of the OAK-D line of cameras. Brandon comes from a background in Electrical and RF Engineering. He spent his early career as a UniFi Lead at Ubiquiti, where his team helped bring Ubiquiti’s highly performant and power-efficient Unifi products to market.

Links

A model that allows robots to follow and guide humans in crowded environments

Assistance robots are typically mobile robots designed to assist humans in malls, airports, health care facilities, home environments and various other settings. Among other things, these robots could help users to find their way around unknown environments, for instance guiding them to a specific location or sharing important information with them.

Mimicking the function of Ruffini receptors using a bio-inspired artificial skin

Mobile robots are now being introduced into a wide variety of real-world settings, including public spaces, home environments, health care facilities and offices. Many of these robots are specifically designed to interact and collaborate with humans, helping them to complete hands-on physical tasks.

The one-wheel Cubli

Researchers Matthias Hofer, Michael Muehlebach and Raffaello D’Andrea have developed the one-wheel Cubli, a three-dimensional pendulum system that can balance on its pivot using a single reaction wheel. How is it possible to stabilize the two tilt angles of the system with only a single reaction wheel?

The key is to design the system such that the inertia in one direction is higher than in the other direction by attaching two masses far away from the center. As a consequence, the system moves faster in the direction with the lower inertia and slower in the direction with the higher inertia. The controller can leverage this property and stabilize both directions simultaneously.

This work was carried out at the Institute for Dynamic Systems and Control, ETH Zurich, Switzerland.

Almost a decade has passed since the first Cubli

The Cubli robot started with a simple idea: Can we build a 15cm sided cube that can jump up, balance on its corner, and walk across our desk using off-the-shelf motors, batteries, and electronic components? The educational article Cubli – A cube that can jump up, balance, and walk across your desk shows all the design principles and prototypes that led to the development of the robot.

Cubli, from ETH Zurich.

Robot overcomes uncertainty to retrieve buried objects

For humans, finding a lost wallet buried under a pile of items is pretty straightforward—we simply remove things from the pile until we find the wallet. But for a robot, this task involves complex reasoning about the pile and objects in it, which presents a steep challenge.
Page 1 of 239
1 2 3 239